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Alternative Health Food Supplement - Sorghum, Spirulina
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Spirulina

GEVA SA

  

  

  

  

Protein

Dried spirulina contains about 60% (51–71%) protein.[2][3] It is a complete protein containing all essential amino acids, with slightly lower amounts of methionine, cysteine, and lysine compared to certain animal-derived products.[4] From a nutritional point of view, spirulina is no better than other protein sources, but is more expensive gram-for-gram and may have adverse interactions when taken with prescribed drugs.[5]


Other nutrients

Provided in its typical supplement form as a dried powder having 5% water (table), a 100 gram amount of spirulina supplies 290 Calories and is an excellent source (20% or more of the Daily Value, DV) of numerous nutrients, particularly B vitamins (thiamin and riboflavin, 207% and 306% DV, respectively) and dietary minerals, such as iron (219% DV) and manganese (90% DV) (table).


Spirulina's lipid content is 8% by weight (table) providing gamma-linolenic acid,[6][7] alpha-linolenic acid, linoleic acid, stearidonic acid,[8] eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, and arachidonic acid.[9]

Spirulina(dried)

Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)

Energy                        1,213 kJ (290 kcal)

Carbohydrates                23.9 g

Sugars                            3.1 g

Dietary fiber                     3.6 g

Fat                                 7.72 g

Saturated                        2.65 g

Monounsaturated            0.675 g

Polyunsaturated               2.08 g

Protein                          57.47 g

Tryptophan                     0.929 g

Threonine                       2.97 g

Isoleucine                       3.209 g

Leucine                          4.947 g

Lysine                            3.025 g

Methionine                     1.149 g

Cystine                          0.662 g

Phenylalanine                 2.777 g

Tyrosine                         2.584 g

Valine                            3.512 g

Arginine                         4.147 g

Histidine                         1.085 g

Alanine                          4.515 g

Aspartic acid                  5.793 g

Glutamic acid                 8.386 g

Glycine                          3.099 g

Proline                           2.382 g

Serine                            2.998 g

Vitamins

Vitamin A equiv.

beta-carotene

lutein zeaxanthin           (4%) 29 μg(3%) 342 μg0 μg

Thiamine (B1)                (207%) 2.38 mg

Riboflavin (B2)                (306%) 3.67 mg

Niacin (B3)                    (85%) 12.82 mg

Pantothenic acid (B5)     (70%) 3.48 mg

Vitamin B6                    (28%) 0.364 mg

Folate (B9)                    (24%) 94 μg

Vitamin B12                  (0%) 0 μg

Choline                         (13%) 66 mg

Vitamin C                      (12%) 10.1 mg

Vitamin D                      (0%) 0 IU

Vitamin E                      (33%) 5 mg

Vitamin K                      (24%) 25.5 μg

Minerals

Calcium                        (12%) 120 mg

Iron                               (219%) 28.5 mg

Magnesium                   (55%) 195 mg

Manganese                   (90%) 1.9 mg

Phosphorus                   (17%) 118 mg

Potassium                     (29%) 1363 mg

Sodium                         (70%) 1048 mg

Zinc                              (21%) 2 mg

Other constituents

Water                            4.68 g

Link to USDA Database entry Units

μg = micrograms • mg = milligrams

IU = International units

Percentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults.

Source: USDA Nutrient Database

Spirulina(dried)

Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)

Energy                        1,213 kJ (290 kcal)

Carbohydrates                23.9 g

Sugars                            3.1 g

Dietary fiber                     3.6 g

Fat                                 7.72 g

Saturated                        2.65 g

Monounsaturated            0.675 g

Polyunsaturated               2.08 g

Protein                          57.47 g

Tryptophan                     0.929 g

Threonine                       2.97 g

Isoleucine                       3.209 g

Leucine                          4.947 g

Lysine                            3.025 g

Methionine                     1.149 g

Cystine                          0.662 g

Phenylalanine                 2.777 g

Tyrosine                         2.584 g

Valine                            3.512 g

Arginine                         4.147 g

Histidine                         1.085 g

Alanine                          4.515 g

Aspartic acid                  5.793 g

Glutamic acid                 8.386 g

Glycine                          3.099 g

Proline                           2.382 g

Serine                            2.998 g

Vitamins

Vitamin A equiv.

beta-carotene

lutein zeaxanthin           (4%) 29 μg(3%) 342 μg0 μg

Thiamine (B1)                (207%) 2.38 mg

Riboflavin (B2)                (306%) 3.67 mg

Niacin (B3)                    (85%) 12.82 mg

Pantothenic acid (B5)     (70%) 3.48 mg

Vitamin B6                    (28%) 0.364 mg

Folate (B9)                    (24%) 94 μg

Vitamin B12                  (0%) 0 μg

Choline                         (13%) 66 mg

Vitamin C                      (12%) 10.1 mg

Vitamin D                      (0%) 0 IU

Vitamin E                      (33%) 5 mg

Vitamin K                      (24%) 25.5 μg

Minerals

Calcium                        (12%) 120 mg

Iron                               (219%) 28.5 mg

Magnesium                   (55%) 195 mg

Manganese                   (90%) 1.9 mg

Phosphorus                   (17%) 118 mg

Potassium                     (29%) 1363 mg

Sodium                         (70%) 1048 mg

Zinc                              (21%) 2 mg

Other constituents

Water                            4.68 g

Link to USDA Database entry Units

μg = micrograms • mg = milligrams

IU = International units

Percentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults.

Source: USDA Nutrient Database

WHAT THE UNITED NATIONS SAYS ABOUT SPIRULINA

“There is a need for both national governments and inter-governmental organizations to re-evaluate the

potential of Spirulina to fulfill both their own food security needs as well as a tool for their overseas

development emergency response efforts”- The UN-Food and Agriculture Organisation(FAO) Report on

Spirulina 2008

“For WHO, Spirulina represents an interesting food for multiple reasons, rich in iron and protein, and is able

to be administered to children without any risk. We at WHO consider it a very suitable food” - United Nations

World Health Organization (WHO), Geneva, Switzerland June 8Th, 1993

Spirulina- was declared by the United Nations World Food Conference of 1974 as the best food for the

futureIIMSAM

Photo From:The IIMSAM Dar al Muamineen Centre, Kenya

SPIRULINA - A SUSTAINABLE APPROACH TO COMBAT MALNUTRITION

Achieving the U.N. MDG’s

In eradicating extreme poverty and hunger, the U.N. Millennium Development Goal #1, sustainable and

long term solutions are essential. These are imperative not only in emergency situations but also as an

investment in a productive society to make a change in people’s everyday life. How can society end

poverty and achieve prosperity, if its children are underdeveloped, mentally retarded or too weak to attend

school? One such sustainable solution is Spirulina, blue-green microalgae which can serve as a vital

source of nutrition. Spirulina is an algae growing naturally under tropical conditions in alkaline water and

can be cultivated in small ponds with little investment. In the long run, there are no cheaper and better

ways to sustainability than creating local businesses which make use of the knowledge and skills of local

women. A truly sustainable solution will emerge if rural women can be profitably involved in the

eradication of malnutrition and, in the process, make a living out of it. Spirulina can become a sustainable

long-term solution if programmes can be designed which enable profitable enterprises that are capable of

combating malnutrition as a business.

How can spirulina eradicate extreme poverty and hunger?

• Spirulina is affordable: to feed a child in India costs between one and two Rupees a day

(U.S. $ 6 to 12 per year). Many other feeding solutions are more costly and less sustainable.

• Spirulina is effective: one gram per day is sufficient enough to correct severe malnutrition

in a child in a few weeks. New studies suggest that Spirulina not only improves the

physical development of the child but also cognitive performance.

• Moreover, Spirulina helps people affected by HIV/AIDS to gain weight and feel better in

their daily life.

• It is a relatively simple process and requires a low investment of only US$ 500 per tank

(18 m2) to produce 150 grams per day.

• It empowers women: spirulina cultivation is labour-intensive, hence an ideal job for rural

women and others.

• It is a local business: spirulina production can be organized as a decentralized rural

industry and can involve local people. Individuals can generate an income through

producing, processing and selling spirulina as a business. It is thus a sustainable long-term

solution

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